20 Reasons the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly is the Greatest Western of All Time

20 Reasons the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly is the Greatest Western of All Time

Following in the tradition of great films such as Jurassic Park, Star Wars and Jaws, it’s time for The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to step forward and shoot all contenders down for it’s the greatest western film of all time. No other film is as epic or as purely cinematic as Sergio Leone’s 1966 spaghetti western, which combines everything that’s remarkable about the work of the late Italian director into one astonishing Movie.Here’s 20 reasons why The Good, the Bad and the Ugly might just be the greatest western film of all time.

  1. Clint Eastwood as Blondie (Aka: The Man With No Name/The Good)

 Clint Eastwood’s character, “Blondie” is the first of many “man with no name” types that he has played in his series of spaghetti westerns. He is labeled “The Good” in the film, but the best his character could have been called is “The Better than the Other Two.” He is still a criminal, he still shoots people, but he is not shown shooting innocents or robbing anyone. He is greedy, but in a nice way (he still leaves Tuco with his share at the end). He even plays with a kitten before one of the major gun battles. For some reason you want to see Blondie win over the other two.

19. It’s a Good Threequel

Third entries in beloved series of films often have a reputation of being the worst.It’s the complete opposite with Leone’s ‘Dollars Trilogy’, with each entry in the series being bigger, better and even more grandiose than the one that came before it.

  1. Quote -Tuco on Blondie

 

“I’m looking for the owner of that horse. He’s tall, blonde, he smokes a cigar, and he’s a pig!” – Tuco

  1. Sergio Leone

 

Known primarily for his spaghetti westerns, Leone breathed life into the tired genre and redefine the western with the magnificent ‘Once Upon A Time In The West’. Like many of the best directors, his style of film-making is still incredibly unique and distinctive to this day. Many of his trademarks, such as mixing extreme close-ups with sweeping long shots, or his love for staging epic sequences which make strong use of sound and music as well as incredible visual imagery have become hugely influential to modern filmmakers.

  1. Scene – The Hanging

Tuco and Blondie’s elaborate scheme to cheat several towns out of reward money for the capture of Tuco gives The Good, the Bad and the Ugly some of its funniest moments. And Tuco’s abusive tirade to Blondie is classic (“You’re the son of a thousand fathers!”).

  1. Eli Wallach as Tuco (The Ugly)

Eli Wallach portrayed Tuco Ramírez – a sniveling, vicious and self serving bandit It would  be easy for Tuco to become a mere stooge, but Leone gives him a fascinating back-story, giving the character both despicable and amusingly dumb.

  1. Quote – Advice To Live Your Life By

 

“If you have to shoot, shoot…. Don’t talk” – Tuco

  1. Ennio Morricone

Ennio Morricone’s score for The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a vital part of why the film is so majestic and epic, and it’s easily one of the all time greatest western scores.

  1. Music : Il Buono, Il Cattivo, Il Brutto (Main Theme)

It’s one of the most distinctive pieces of music ever composed for a film and even spent weeks on the music charts as a hit single.The theme music has become a calling card for the entire Western genre.

  1. The Extreme Close-ups

 

One of Leone’s trademark directorial flourishes can be seen The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

Scenes are frequently punctuated by extreme close-ups of eyes and faces, or even simply a hand slowly reaching towards a holstered gun. These shots help build tension and suspense.

  1. Red Dead Redemption

 

One of the greatest films of all time has a distinct influence on one of the greatest games of all time, Rockstar’s ‘Red Dead Redemption’.

Lead character John Marsden bares more than a passing resemblance to The Man With No Name, complete with unlockable outfits similar to those seen in the film, such as the distinctive Clint Eastwood poncho and Blondie’s duster.

The missions themselves are also full of references to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, with players able to shoot noose ropes to free hanging prisoners, while another mission has you blowing up a bridge in a similar scenario to the classic Civil War sequence in the film.

  1. Lee Van Cleef as Angel Eyes (The Bad)

 

Lee Van Cleef’s distinctive chiseled features and sharp impenetrable glare made him a perfect fit for the Western genre, especially the two films for which he worked with Leone – ‘For A Few Dollars More’ and ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Scene – The Ghost Town

 

After being bombarded by artillery fire, Tuco and Blondie find themselves in the wreckage of a deserted and seemingly lifeless town.

What follows is a fantastic sequence with the pair walking through the shell of the town and gunning down men from all angles – complete with the obligatory stuntman falling off rooftop gag.

  1. Music: L’Estasi Dell’oro (The Ecstasy of Gold)

Ecstasy of Gold is an amazingly epic and grand piece of Ennio Morricone’s score and one of his finest compositions. While it’s not as well recognized as the main theme, Ecstasy of Gold has become a classic piece of music and has since been covered by Metallica.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. It’s The Quintessential Spaghetti Western

 

If you mention the term Spaghetti Western to anyone, chances are they’ll immediately think of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly as it has become the definitive and quintessential Spaghetti Western.

5. Quote – The Switcheroo

 

“Look, one son of a bitch goes in, and another son of a bitch comes out!” – Tuco

 

 

4. The Character Introductions

Leone introduces each of the three characters through an audacious prologue which lasts for 30 minutes, has no dialogue for 10 of them, and even subtitles each character in brilliant freeze-frame captions.

3. Scene – The Gun Shop

The gun shop scene – in which Tuco holds a gun store owner hostage while he finds himself a suitable gun to hunt down Blondie .

2. The Opening Titles

Using a variety of colours and gritty photos of sequences from the film as well as animation, the titles designed by Iginio Lardani are incredibly cool – especially alongside Morricone’s score.

1. Clint and the Kitten

In the midst of the violence, Clint can be seen cuddling a random kitten and letting it play around in his hat Just to show that he’s not that bad.
Following in the tradition of great films such as Jurassic Park, Star Wars and Jaws, it’s time for The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to step forward and shoot all contenders down for it’s the greatest western film of all time. No other film is as epic or as purely cinematic as Sergio Leone’s 1966 spaghetti western, which combines everything that’s remarkable about the work of the late Italian director into one astonishing Movie.Here’s 20 reasons why The Good, the Bad and the Ugly might just be the greatest western film of all time.

20. Clint Eastwood as Blondie (Aka: The Man With No Name/The Good)

Clint Eastwood’s character, “Blondie” is the first of many “man with no name” types that he has played in his series of spaghetti westerns. He is labeled “The Good” in the film, but the best his character could have been called is “The Better than the Other Two.” He is still a criminal, he still shoots people, but he is not shown shooting innocents or robbing anyone. He is greedy, but in a nice way (he still leaves Tuco with his share at the end). He even plays with a kitten before one of the major gun battles. For some reason you want to see Blondie win over the other two.

19. It’s a Great Threequel

Third entries in beloved series of films often have a reputation of being the worst.It’s the complete opposite with Leone’s ‘Dollars Trilogy’, with each entry in the series being bigger, better and even more grandiose than the one that came before it.

18. Quote -Tuco on Blondie

“I’m looking for the owner of that horse. He’s tall, blonde, he smokes a cigar, and he’s a pig!” – Tuco

17. Sergio Leone

sergioleone

Known primarily for his spaghetti westerns, Leone breathed life into the tired genre and redefine the western with the magnificent ‘Once Upon A Time In The West’. Like many of the best directors, his style of film-making is still incredibly unique and distinctive to this day. Many of his trademarks, such as mixing extreme close-ups with sweeping long shots, or his love for staging epic sequences which make strong use of sound and music as well as incredible visual imagery have become hugely influential to modern filmmakers.
16. Scene – The Hanging

thehanging

Tuco and Blondie’s elaborate scheme to cheat several towns out of reward money for the capture of Tuco gives The Good, the Bad and the Ugly some of its funniest moments. And Tuco’s abusive tirade to Blondie is classic (“You’re the son of a thousand fathers!”).
15. Eli Wallach as Tuco (The Ugly)

Eli Wallach portrayed Tuco Ramírez – a sniveling, vicious and self serving bandit It would be easy for Tuco to become a mere stooge, but Leone gives him a fascinating back-story, giving the character both despicable and amusingly dumb.
14. Quote – Advice To Live Your Life By

“If you have to shoot, shoot…. Don’t talk” – Tuco
13. Ennio Morricone

Ennio Morricone’s score for The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is a vital part of why the film is so majestic and epic, and it’s easily one of the all time greatest western scores.
12. Music : Il Buono, Il Cattivo, Il Brutto (Main Theme)
It’s one of the most distinctive pieces of music ever composed for a film and even spent weeks on the music charts as a hit single.The theme music has become a calling card for the entire Western genre.
11. The Extreme Close-ups

ecu

One of Leone’s trademark directorial flourishes can be seen The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.
Scenes are frequently punctuated by extreme close-ups of eyes and faces, or even simply a hand slowly reaching towards a holstered gun. These shots help build tension and suspense.
10. Red Dead Redemption

rdr

One of the greatest films of all time has a distinct influence on one of the greatest games of all time, Rockstar’s ‘Red Dead Redemption’.
Lead character John Marsden bares more than a passing resemblance to The Man With No Name, complete with unlockable outfits similar to those seen in the film, such as the distinctive poncho and Blondie’s duster.
The missions themselves are also full of references to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, with players able to shoot noose ropes to free hanging prisoners, while another mission has you blowing up a bridge in a similar scenario to the classic Civil War sequence in the film.
9. Lee Van Cleef as Angel Eyes (The Bad)

Lee Van Cleef’s distinctive chiseled features and sharp impenetrable glare made him a perfect fit for the Western genre, especially the two films for which he worked with Leone – ‘For A Few Dollars More’ and ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’.

8. Scene – The Ghost Town

ghosttown

After being bombarded by artillery fire, Tuco and Blondie find themselves in the wreckage of a deserted and seemingly lifeless town.
What follows is a fantastic sequence with the pair walking through the shell of the town and gunning down men from all angles – complete with the obligatory stuntman falling off rooftop gag.
7. Music: L’Estasi Dell’oro (The Ecstasy of Gold)
Ecstasy of Gold is an amazingly epic and grand piece of Ennio Morricone’s score and one of his finest compositions. While it’s not as well recognized as the main theme, Ecstasy of Gold has become a classic piece of music and has since been covered by Metallica.

6. It’s The Quintessential Spaghetti Western

If you mention the term Spaghetti Western to anyone, chances are they’ll immediately think of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly as it has become the definitive and quintessential Spaghetti Western.
5. Quote – The Switcheroo

“Look, one son of a bitch goes in, and another son of a bitch comes out!” – Tuco

4. The Character Introductions

Leone introduces each of the three characters through an audacious prologue which lasts for 30 minutes, has no dialogue for 10 of them, and even subtitles each character in brilliant freeze-frame captions.
3. Scene – The Gun Shop
The gun shop scene – in which Tuco holds a gun store owner hostage while he finds himself a suitable gun to hunt down Blondie .
2. The Opening Titles

gbutitles

Using a variety of colours and gritty photos of sequences from the film as well as animation, the titles designed by Iginio Lardani are incredibly cool – especially alongside Morricone’s score.
1. Clint and the Kitten
In the midst of the violence, Clint can be seen cuddling a random kitten and letting it play around in his hat Just to show that he’s not that bad.

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